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Shopping for any enterprise software solution can feel like a monumental task. Often, by the time it gets to the point where a company is willing to entertain the idea of software as a solution, there are so many problems stemming from a particular way of doing business that it’s hard to determine where to even begin. Add cost to the equation any new technology will likely be expensive and the pressure of finding the right solution is enough to make any evaluator go running for the hills. 

The Curse of the One-Hour Meeting 

There’s no shortage of jokes about the futility of the average business meeting. Comic strips lament it. Television shows highlight its honor in the hierarchy of company doldrums. It’s possible there is a level of Dante’s Inferno devoted solely to business meetings. 

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Here's an elephant in the meeting room that no one ever discusses: Meetings are hugely expensive. 

During the next meeting you attend, add up the hourly cost of every person in the conference room. Then imagine, that you're writing the check for that meeting. If the money came out of your pocket, would you have the meeting? Has the meeting been worth that amount? Who's going to pay for it? And would you have any meetings at all?

Then factor in the opportunity cost for what every person in the room could be achieving instead of listening to John from the Dev Team talk about groundbreaking innovations in a code update somewhere in the stack, or Suzy from HR having another of her monologs during the roundup.

Any meeting that won't directly generate revenue or cost savings, either in the form of a key decision or a concrete plan of action, is likely a complete waste of money.

And I would bet that a lot of people and organizations don't have a clue! One thing is the cost of all the resources and time spent on planning the meeting. Now, this is just about the meeting itself.