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Millennials have fully infiltrated the workforce and they’re changing it … for the better. Once seen as an entitled, overly coddled generation, employers have come to realize that in fact, this rising generation of workers and leaders is deeply committed, socially connected, and incredibly productive. Never before has a group of people been more inundated with technology throughout the entirety of their lives. As a result, they think differently and expect more. 

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Move over, Baby Boomers, the next generation of the workforce is here. And they’re demanding change.

As of 2017, Millennials—those born between 1981 and 1996—make up the largest generation in the workforce. They’re bringing with them new talents, capabilities, and work ethics. They’re also bringing a number of expectations about the type of companies they want to work for, the offices they want to spend their time, and the style of working they want to execute.

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Humans are a curious bunch. Throughout our storied history, we’ve often modeled our behavior off doctrines for decades, if not centuries, before questioning why or setting out to disprove them. These myths and superstitions have led to what today we would consider ridiculous behavior or foolish beliefs; like avoiding cracks in the sidewalk, not handling toads so as not to get warts, or imbibing in the hair of the dog (both literally to heal that dog bite or figuratively to heal that hangover). 

Just as placing some hair of the dog that bit you into your dog bite (and cracking that beer first thing in the morning) isn’t going to cure your wound (or your pounding headache), there are a number of myths that pervade your office that may actually be doing more harm than good. Many of these office myths might make sense at first glance, but result in some surprising consequences that hamper productivity and employee morale. 

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The standards of the modern office are shifting all the time. Gone are the days of cubicle farms and compartmentalized solitude. Gourmet coffee, cabinets of snacks, dogs in the office, and funky furniture fill newly designed open spaces. Large windows cast natural light throughout open rooms with rows of desks. Large spaces, open concepts, and room for collaboration are all the goals of the modern office.