AdobeStock_182679458-371540-edited

Picture this: You prepared all week for an important meeting on Thursday afternoon. Clients have come in from out of town to attend. Partners from across the city will also be joining. In addition to the amount of time you’ve spent preparing the presentation, you spent hours searching for the right room to accommodate the number of people and technical needs, ordered catering so food arrives at the right time, and coordinated with the front desk staff each time there is a change to the guest list.

AdobeStock_101665287-966163-edited

Boston-based law firm Burns & Levinson is comprised of 125 attorneys who focus on a number of core practices and specialties. The firm was founded in 1960 on the principle of being accessible and responsive to clients. This client-centric commitment to service means attorneys serve as advisors, legal counsel, and business strategists and are available to offer personal attention from senior partners on down.

As such, meetings at the firm are a near constant occurrence. Booking them, however, was a labor intensive and often frustrating experience. Employees lacked a system that organized meeting room bookings and kept everyone up to date, so they relied on Excel spreadsheets that were managed by office administrators.

Patty-Cake-infografic-hero-image

Meetings: the necessary evil of every business. We need them, they’re not going anywhere, yet office employees site them as the number one waste of time throughout their week and biggest hindrance to productivity. Eliminating the many tedious tasks associated with every meeting—such as finding and booking rooms, reserving technology, ordering catering, and dealing with guests—is a first and tremendously important step in saving time, boosting productivity, and improving employee morale when it comes to meetings.

Workplace myths infographic-hero image-02

Humans are a curious bunch. Throughout our storied history, we’ve often modeled our behavior off doctrines for decades, if not centuries, before questioning why or setting out to disprove them. These myths and superstitions have led to what today we would consider ridiculous behavior or foolish beliefs; like avoiding cracks in the sidewalk, not handling toads so as not to get warts, or imbibing in the hair of the dog (both literally to heal that dog bite or figuratively to heal that hangover). 

Just as placing some hair of the dog that bit you into your dog bite (and cracking that beer first thing in the morning) isn’t going to cure your wound (or your pounding headache), there are a number of myths that pervade your office that may actually be doing more harm than good. Many of these office myths might make sense at first glance, but result in some surprising consequences that hamper productivity and employee morale. 

Buyer's guide-273105-edited

The meeting challenge 

We say it so often it, it should be one of our taglines: without a meeting management solution, a one-hour meeting is never just a one-hour meeting. Meetings are a constant source of wasted resources and frustrated office workers. In fact, according to recent research, meetings are considered the No. 1 time-waster at the office.