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The list of reasons to hire an office manager are almost as endless as the potential roles they can fill within your company. Search through job descriptions for the position and you’ll find a dizzying array of responsibilities outlined from operations and administrative duties to budgeting and billing. That’s because an office manager’s main job is to make the day-to-day operations of your business run smoothly, whatever that may mean for your company, and because of this the role is flexible enough to fulfill just about any needs you may have.

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Your front desk staff wears many hats for your company. It could be argued that this position is one of the most varied, perceptive, and all-encompassing in the organization. Depending on the size of your company, this person serves the role of scheduler, office manager, travel agent, conflict negotiator, and meeting manager. From stocking office supplies and making copies to greeting visitors as the face of the company, they keep the flow of the office running smoothly.

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Millennials have fully infiltrated the workforce and they’re changing it … for the better. Once seen as an entitled, overly coddled generation, employers have come to realize that in fact, this rising generation of workers and leaders is deeply committed, socially connected, and incredibly productive. Never before has a group of people been more inundated with technology throughout the entirety of their lives. As a result, they think differently and expect more. 

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“Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.” – Groucho Marx 

What is a more valuable commodity than your time? Truly, there is never enough of it. That’s why when it comes to the time you spend at work, learning how to maximize the hours of your day is critical to success. Not only does good time management make you a more efficient and productive worker, but it enables you to better take advantage of the valuable time spent out of work as much as it allows you to maximize the time spent in work. This is a key component to a healthy modern workplace. 

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It and Facilities Management. There are no departments more critical to ensuring businesses stay humming every day. And perhaps, they’re the two most overlooked and underappreciated. We all know the stereotypes. IT stays locked in their dark server rooms until called out to help fix someone’s (probably stupid) technical problem. And facilities management might not even be considered until new hardware or services need to be installed or repaired. 

The reality is, these two departments work to ensure every other department in the company has the tools and resources they need to do their jobs. Both departments have evolved to meet the needs of an increasingly complicated office ecosystem. To understand how both departments must work together to ensure overall operational success, let’s start with understanding what each department actually does. 

 

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Investing in new software is risky 

Technology advances and changes at such a breathtaking pace these days it’s hard to keep up. Whether it be consumer electronics or enterprise software solutions, what is groundbreaking one moment seems woefully inadequate the next when a new version, product, or way of thinking emerges. Many companies invest years of time and hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars into finding and implementing the perfect technological solution, only to find a different solution that better fits their needs is now available. 

That’s why shopping for enterprise software can be such an overwhelming process. We’ve covered this topic here on the AskCody blog before because it’s an important one. We regularly hear from evaluators that knowing where to start is often the hardest part. That’s why it’s critical to arm yourself with the knowledge you need to confidently make decisions about the future of your business needs and the capabilities of the tools at your disposal. 

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The modern workplace of today bears little resemblance to the modern workplace of 50 years ago. Just think about the mid-day booze-swilling, male-dominated, Mad Man-era office setting compared to today’s increasingly diverse, kombucha-sipping, dog-friendly open spaces. Some changes have evolved slowly like workplace diversity and others have cropped up seemingly overnight like gourmet coffee bars and company kick ball leagues. 

We’ve written a lot about the environment of today’s modern workplace, but as you strive to keep your company attractive and competitive today, it’s critical to plan for what’s going to make it shine in the future. The last thing you want to do is invest in a full-scale office remodel, only to find what you consider modern today is outdated thinking five years from now. Making those predictions may seem like an exercise in futility which office worker in the 1970s would dream that ping-pong tables would replace conference room tables and cubicles would relegated to the depths of office hell? That’s why we’ve put together a guide for planning for the office of the future. 

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The benefits of modern office design are proven and plentiful, but employees often lament about their lack of privacy and quiet spaces that are lacking in open office concepts. Learn why companies must look for ways to add privacy and quiet areas without reverting to the traditional office design and how they can do it.