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We talk a lot about what it means to be modern workplace here at AskCody. We’re always taking a microscope to the latest office trends so we can figure out what works, what doesn’t, and what it would take to make something that doesn’t actually work. You follow?

There are plenty of movements in recent years that have totally flipped corporate culture on its head. I don’t need to tell you about the death of the cubicle farm or the rise of the WFH wave. But as we’ve written about before, what works for one company (or even one department), does not necessarily work for all.

The key is be able to respond intelligently and thoughtfully to the flexibility that today’s workforce craves without letting the office slide into a free-for-all of open spaces, zero privacy, and a frustrating search for open resources.

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You’ve probably heard the statistic: about 40% of the current workforce is already made up of freelancers, solopreneurs, or so-called “contingent” workers, and that number is growing. While it’s true that advances in technology and changes in the makeup of today’s workforce have led to new ideas about where and how work gets done, the modern office is far from dead.

Social attitudes about what constitutes meaningful work have evolved significantly over the last 10-20 years, including our goals for the modern workplace. Today, the focus has shifted toward workspaces that foster human interaction and collaboration.

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Given the mobility and flexibility of today’s office workers, a new challenge has emerged for the modern workplace: the optimization of office space. Hot desks, office hoteling, and collaborative workstations have taken the place of the traditional office. As a result, companies must evolve their thinking of what an office even looks like. To do so accurately and effectively, they are turning to office sensors.