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As we all know too well, stress doesn’t just disappear when you leave the office for the day. Like email notifications on your phone, stress follows you home each day, affecting your personal relationships, as well as your mental and physical health. When left unacknowledged, stress can cause a bevy of health problems, including anxiety, depression, insomnia, high blood pressure, hypertension, and even increase the likelihood of heart disease. While you can’t eradicate stress from your life or change your immediate circumstances at work, there are still things you can do to help alleviate the stress for both you and your employees.

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The definition of workplace security has expanded greatly in today’s digital age. Companies must not only consider employee, customer, and financial safety from external forces – fires, natural disasters, chemical spills and contamination, civil disturbances, terrorism – but also from internal forces – workplace violence, employee theft, intellectual property theft, and data theft.

There are many security risks that could happen within the walls of your office and systems. Your priority must be to provide a safe and secure work environment for your employees and visitors. By law, that means your company must provide an environment free of health and safety hazards, as well as psychological hazards.

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You’ve probably heard the statistic: about 40% of the current workforce is already made up of freelancers, solopreneurs, or so-called “contingent” workers, and that number is growing. While it’s true that advances in technology and changes in the makeup of today’s workforce have led to new ideas about where and how work gets done, the modern office is far from dead.

Social attitudes about what constitutes meaningful work have evolved significantly over the last 10-20 years, including our goals for the modern workplace. Today, the focus has shifted toward workspaces that foster human interaction and collaboration.

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It’s no secret that the office landscape has changed dramatically in recent years. Demographics of the workforce are changing, with more women and minorities currently advancing professionally than ever before, and more generations than ever are sharing the workplace as well. Meanwhile, rapidly advancing technology has shifted cultural attitudes about work and office design, as well as the expectations and priorities of both companies and their employees.

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Most of us are already familiar with a hierarchical, or centralized organizational structure. From the government and military to large corporations, a centralized management system has long been the norm. However, more and more organizations of every size are starting to value more egalitarian organizational landscapes. As technology increases agility in day-to-day business operations, decisions need to be made with equal agility, and many are finding that it has become necessary to adapt.